one more place in kutch: than and the dhinodhar

as self-punishment for the destroying of mandvi a man called dhoramnath stood 12 years on his head on the top of the mountain dhinodhar, what means the patience bearer. the dhinodhar was the third mountain he climbed up. the first hill was weighed down of his sins, the second one was broken down of his guilt. while the 12 years a woman was feeding him with milk. the gods heard about dhoramnath and ask him to stop his punishment. he agreed under the condition, that the first point, where he will look  to will dry out and will become infertil. the gods directed his gaze to the sea which dried out and where the great rann of kutch arised. dharmnath moved his view, fearing that it would kill many fish, and split the mountain into two. then he came down the hill, founded the order of kanpathas and built the monastery on the foot of the mountain.


from bhuj they took the bus in the afternoon. the passengers were happy about the company of this young foreign women. the men offered them beedis, were laughing with them. the bus took a way through all the villages between bhuj and the goal destination somewhere in the north-west of kutch. the journey lasted nearly three hours and the girls arrived the monastery of than when the sun was going down. an old man asked them in, they followed his offering into the mainhall where the baba was. a big stone hall, nearly empty, on the head the altar decorated with many colourful pictures of gods and godesses, gurus and babas. the girls were shy and sit down on the ground to the wall away from the baba. he looked young, younger than he was. his eyes were dark and he has an appraising look. he said with his deep voice hello, excused hisself and started his evening puja. the girls were observing this long and loudly ceremony, still feeling insecure if they are welcome here. after the puja the baba asked them few questions, and offered them food. the old man brought the food, were smiling to the girls. while eating more men were coming into the room, surrounded the baba, were talking with him. the girls felt shy to interrupt them, to ask for the way to the top of the dhinodhar. just follow the white signs. if you want to see the sunrise from the top, you have to start early in the morning. after food the old man showed them their room to sleep. a huge room, just with some blankets on the floor. later the young women were laying awake, couldn´t fall asleep. it was hot,  too many ants everywhere, too many thoughts to think about.

they missed the sunrise and started their hike to the top of the dhinodhar when the sun was already high on the sky. they needed longer, the walk was exhausting and the way not as easy to find as they were thinking before. they looked for the white marks between boulders and stones.  hexagonal stones. thorny, gnarled plants. they liked this hostile nature. the climb was steep, the area dry. nevertheless they heard and met shepherds with his goats and sheep. the top rewarded them with the view over the country. brown and ocher with green sprinkles and few blue threads shining through the hazy air. the baba of the temple on the top rewarded them with chai, bananas and sweets.

the rest of the day they spent in the monastery, discovering its corridors, courts and paintings, watching the green parrots and peacocks, listening to their shouting, sitting together with the cook in the kitchen, drinking chai and smoking beedi, trying to talk in a mixture of hindi and gestures with him. the night they were sleeping on the rooftop under the sky with its red moon and sparkling stars. it has been the last day together for the girls. the next day they would be separated. one of them would stay longer in kutch, the other would take the train to delhi where her flight would go back. they wished they would have more time at this place., where just this few men (the baba, a shepherd and the cook) and some cows and goats and birds were living


 

 

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